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Thread: Cool Underground Tunnel and Nanaimo's Old Mine Shafts

  1. #1811

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    I dont plan on going into any mine's, I would not do that to my family......I would like to find out more information and just look around at the history of Nanaimo. I have lived here my whole life and do not know much about. Any family that I did have, have passed on so I have know one to ask. Thanks for you concerns on safety.

  2. #1812

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    Quote Originally Posted by km111 View Post
    I dont plan on going into any mine's, I would not do that to my family......I would like to find out more information and just look around at the history of Nanaimo. I have lived here my whole life and do not know much about. Any family that I did have, have passed on so I have know one to ask. Thanks for you concerns on safety.
    Perhaps this has been posted already. If so, pardon the repeat.
    Anyway, if you have a GPS this site should be of interest. I can't vouch for the accuracy of the coordinates but they should get you into the right ballpark.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...e_Nanaimo_area

  3. #1813
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Wellington
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    169

    Default Sink hole

    Quote Originally Posted by Steamer_1949 View Post
    Perhaps this has been posted already. If so, pardon the repeat.
    Anyway, if you have a GPS this site should be of interest. I can't vouch for the accuracy of the coordinates but they should get you into the right ballpark.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...e_Nanaimo_area
    With such an extensive list of mines, I wonder if the downtown plus Newcastle and Protection islands would drop a few feet into the sea in the event of a big earthquake.

  4. #1814
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Default

    Interesting thought. And I wonder how many pockets of air are down there. If there are many, then perhaps that event you're imagining would include tumultuous waters in the harbour, with big bubbles opening at the surface. I wonder what that air smells like?

  5. Default

    Peter Roosen asked: "Anybody know how hot it got for those working island coal mines?"

    I **do** know, having worked underground at Wolf Mountain and in the various mines of the Quinsam colliery. The simple answer is: "cold, except adjacent to areas of spontaneous combustion". The long answer is that the sedimentary basins around Georgia Strait have remarkably low geothermal gradient (with the possible exception of the Mount Washington area, where some hydrothermal activity is still happening). Back in 1985, Novacorp ran a borehole temperature log as part of their regional drilling programme, and found a disappointingly low set of bottom-hole temperatures.

    In lived experience, I wore a heavy wool sweater and thick wool trousers as part of my daily working garb; I'd guess that the average temperature at the working-faces in Quinsam was about 6C, and at Wolf Mountain about 4C. This should be no surprise, given that there are glaciers in the higher ranges of central Vancouver Island.

    I did not work in No.1 Mine under Nanaimo Harbour (which, after all, closed long before I was born let alone got into the mining business); I do understand that in some of the more isolated sections of workings the ventilation was sluggish, and the broken pillar-coal had a regrettable tendency toward self-ignition, and to a general district-wide heating of the workings.

    I don't need a tinfoil hat, Peter: I already have a tooled-steel hard-hat from the Russian coal mines, covered with scenes of heroic Stakhanovites working with longwall shearers. Don't wear it underground, since conductive metal is not the best thing to have on one's head when there are 6.6-KV cables snaking through wet workings. ^_^

  6. #1816
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Nanaimo
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    Ah, this is great information, Gwyneth! This really helps one to imagine how it was. I think I always pictured it being hot down there.

  7. #1817
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Port moody
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    Just got back fron the Cle Elum and Roslyn areas of Washington state. For those interested, these areas are rich in coal mining history. There is coal slack everywhere, and although i did not have time to check it out, I'm under the impression that there are many old mines in the area. Nice countryside too.
    Coming to you "LIVE AND IN COLOUR",from the BIG MOO!!;)

  8. #1818
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    Jul 2006
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    Port moody
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    203

    Default Roslyn mine explosion

    Mine accident of 1892





    Memorial to miners. Radio station set for Northern Exposure television show in background.
    In 1892, 45 miners were killed in an explosion of Mine No. 4, the deadliest mining accident in Washington history. The town hit its peak population, around 4,000, during the 1920s, before the coal industry started to wind down in the area. The Cle Elum Echo (a local paper) reported: "The city of Roslyn is situated on land directly over the tunnel of Mine No. 4, and the shock caused by the explosion was not unlike an earthquake, shaking buildings in all parts of the city, while the burning, oil soaked timbers, vomited out of the shaft, were scattered in all directions, falling upon shingled roofs and causing over twenty roof fires, which were controlled by bucket brigades, all the city water and the fire department being concentrated upon the shaft and abutting frame structures, in spite of this all frame structures within two hundred feet of the shaft and tipple No. 4 were entirely destroyed."[
    Coming to you "LIVE AND IN COLOUR",from the BIG MOO!!;)

  9. #1819
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    Port moody
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    Coal deposits were first noticed in the Roslyn area in 1883, with a large vein discovered at the upper Smith Creek canyon in 1885 by C.P. Brosious, Walter J. Reed, and Ignatius A. Navarre.[4] Roslyn was platted in 1886 by Logan M. Bullet, vice president of the Northern Pacific Coal Co., and the first commercial coal mining operations were begun to support railway operations. Throughout the middle 1880s, the Northern Pacific Railway, the parent of Northern Pacific Coal Co., pushed to reach Puget Sound across the Cascade Mountains. The Northern Pacific began building across Stampede Pass just west of Roslyn, approaching from Wallula in the east and Tacoma in the west. A 77-mile (124-km) gap remained in 1886. In January of that year, Nelson Bennett was given a contract to construct a 9,850 foot (3,002 m) tunnel under Stampede Pass, completing it in 1888. Roslyn, which lies on the route to Stampede Pass, provided the coal for the railway construction work as well as the continuing railroad operations.
    Coming to you "LIVE AND IN COLOUR",from the BIG MOO!!;)

  10. #1820
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    Early years and industries

    The founders of Cle Elum were Thomas L. Gamble(later known as Judge Gamble) and Walter J. Reid. Mr. Gamble took up a Quarter section of land in Section 26, Township 20 North, and Range 15 East, in April, 1883 with the intent of farming the land. Mr. Reed took a claim adjoining Mr. Gamble's on the West. On those two preemptive claims the town was laid out. The date of these filings was three years prior to the discovery of coal. Scattered discoveries of coal ledges had been made in 1883 and 1884, but in 1886 a definite discovery of a large ledge of good coal in paying quantities made it clear that a most important stage had come in the history of the region and populations in the region began to increase. Meanwhile, the Northern Pacific Railway was seeking a route over the Cascade Mountains.

    Some assert that the selection of the Stampede Pass was determined by the coal discovery. In the Spring of 1886 the railroad engineers under Mr. Bogue and Mr. Huson were making their survey through the region with the intent of establishing a station. At the site of the future city, a Northern Pacific Railway station was named Clealum after the Kittitas name Tle-el-Lum (tlielləm), meaning "swift water", referring to the Cle Elum River. In 1908, Clealum was altered to Cle Elum.[3] The name was given to the river, the city, and Cle Elum Lake. Walter Reed entered into a partnership with Thomas Johnson of Ellensburg and laid out sixty-five acres as a site. This was legally dedicated on July 26. of 1886. Mr. Johnson had owned a sawmill on Wilson Creek, in Grant County and he moved the mill to the new location in the vicinity of the new town. The partners, Reed and Johnson, established what was undoubtedly the largest mill up to that time in central or Eastern Washington, cutting 40,000 feet of board lumber per day. At the same time, Frederick Leonhard, who with his brother-in-law, Gerrit d'Ablaing, had been carrying on a mill on Cooke Creek and later on the Naneum, moved to the vicinity of Cle Elum. They cut a large part of the lumber for the Stampede Tunnel.
    Coming to you "LIVE AND IN COLOUR",from the BIG MOO!!;)

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